Now Accepting Nebraska Surrogates for Surrogacy Journeys

February 12, 2024
Washington, DC

Breaking News: Creative Family Connections Now Accepting Nebraska Surrogates for Compensated Gestational Surrogacy Journeys

Nebraska law change leaves only two red-light states on The US Surrogacy Law Map™

Creative Family Connections is excited to announce it is now accepting Nebraska surrogates for compensated gestational surrogacy journeys with intended parents. This new development follows changes to Nebraska’s statute.

“We are excited to expand our services to Nebraska, allowing us to match Nebraska surrogates with LGBTQ+ and heterosexual couples who are married and have at least one genetic connection to the embryo,” stated Diane Hinson, Owner & Founder of Creative Family Connections.

The US Surrogacy Map™ reflects this significant Nebraska update and reaffirms Creative Family Connections’ commitment to provide comprehensive surrogacy services nationwide. With this change to Nebraska law, only two US states prohibit commercial surrogacy – and one of those states, Michigan, has legislation pending to legalize it.

The US is one of the few countries in the world that recognizes a constitutional right to bear children. For some prospective parents, surrogacy is the only way to achieve that goal. “It’s really wonderful how the state-by-state landscape has changed over the last nine years to become a sea of ‘green-light’ states,” added Hinson, who created the original version of The US Surrogacy Map™ and continues to oversee its updates.

The U.S. Surrogacy Map™


Creative Family Connections is a top-rated surrogacy agency and law firm. Intended Parents come from across the nation and around the globe for its compassionate and high-touch services. For more information about becoming a surrogate or becoming a parent through surrogacy, please visit www.creativefamilyconnections.com or contact us.

Devenir une mère porteuse Devenir parent

Previous Article10 Reasons to Consider Surrogacy Next ArticlePope Francis’s Call to Ban Surrogacy: A Critical Examination